Dogs

Caring for your Dog

Taking on a dog is a big commitment and there are a number of factors to consider when deciding whether a dog is the right pet for you. Dogs cost money. Don’t underestimate the cost of the new addition to the family. As well as the initial cost of the dog you need to think of the price of food, bedding, toys, boarding kennels and vet bills for regular check-ups and unforeseen incidences. Take time to work out all possible costs and make sure you can afford your new companion.

Quick Tip

Dogs need plenty of exercise and love to walk and run, they should be given the opportunity to do both of these activities on a daily basis (unless your vet recommends otherwise).

View our products

View our dog food

The 2013 PDSA Paw report identifies that the actual lifetime cost of a dog will be between £16-31k depending on breed and size of the dog.

With a new dog – playful puppy or dignified senior your first move should be to register your pet with a vet and arrange a general check-up.  If you are ever concerned about your pet’s health, see your vet immediately.

Dogs require time and attention. You also need to be sure that you can give your dog the time, attention and exercise he needs to lead a happy and contented life. This will vary by breed, so do some research, talk to other dog owners and contact breeders to make sure that the dog you get fits in with your lifestyle.

Did you know?

Dogs are incredibly sociable. They are capable of forming relationships with other dogs and can also form strong bonds with humans.

Did you know?

Dogs have an amazing sense of smell, they can also hear sounds up to four times quieter than humans can hear.

Dogs need a lot of equipment. On a basic level you will need the following for your dog;

  • Collar
  • Identity tag (It is also a legal requirement for all dogs to wear a collar and identity tag in a public place, The Control of Dogs Order, 1992)
  • Micro chipping
  • Vaccination s against parvovirus, leptospirosis, kennel cough, Canine Distemper, Infectious Canine Hepatitis, Canine Adenovirus and Canine Parainfluenza.
  • Food and water bowls
  • Bed, large enough for the dog to stretch out in to rest and to sleep, plus some washable bedding
  • Old towels (to dry off wet and muddy dogs)
  • First aid kit  to include bandages, gauze, wound dressings, scissors, hand wash, plaster tape and antiseptic wipes
  • Grooming tools (requirements vary by breed)
  • Toys
  • Life stage appropriate food

Your Dog will need time to adjust. When you get your dog remember that this is a whole new environment for him, so give him time and space to settle in and feel secure.

Your dog will need lots of looking after. When your new friend arrives there are routine care and jobs that are needed. On a daily basis you will need to make sure he gets the exercise and stimulation his breed requires, feed him and clean his bowl, make sure he has fresh water available, monitor his behaviour, check his ‘poo’ for any abnormalities, check his collar for fit and comfort, maintain on-going training, and give him lots of love! Every month you’ll need to check his weight (please see PFMA body condition scoring image below) and check for fleas. Preventative flea treatments are a great way to stop flea infestation. Every three months he’ll need de-worming and on a yearly basis he’ll need a vet check-up and vaccination boosters (as and when advised by your vet).

As long as you have a good understanding of what owning a dog entails and you can give him the love and commitment he requires then you will have a happy and active friend and companion.

Quick Tip

Microchipping your dog is advisable, a small device is simply placed under the skin containing a unique number. This number is stored on a national database with the owner’s contact details so if a dog is ever lost the owner can be notified.

View our products

View our dog food

Have a question?

If you have a question, please email us or call us on 0800 413 969. Our dedicated consumer care team are available to answer any questions you may have. If you are concerned about the immediate health of your pet, please seek the advice of your vet as soon as possible.

Email us