Hamsters

Companionship

Should you keep a lone hamster or aim for two or more? The answer is: it depends on the species. Dwarf Roborovski and both dwarf Russian varieties (Campbells and Winter White) are sociable and generally love nothing more than cuddling up and playing together. However, they can fall out so it is important to keep an eye out for bullying or any form of aggression and be prepared to separate them if required. Aim for a pair or small group of the same sex – otherwise there’ll be a mini population explosion. Accommodation for multiple dwarfs is best without separate compartments, as separate areas can lead to territorial behaviour.

Quick Tip

Your hamster should be kept in a large, clean cage in a quiet place indoors.

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Burgess Hamster food

Your Syrian hamster is solitary by nature and the golden rule is one Syrian hamster to one cage. It will enjoy contact with you, but won’t get on with other hamsters. So, no pairs or groups.

Chinese hamsters can also can live in pairs or small groups, however they can fall out so it is important to keep an eye out for bullying or any form of aggression and separate them if required.

When hamsters aren’t sleeping or eating, they’re looking for action. And play is number one on their list. A little exploration, a little something to chew on – heaven. Of course, what they don’t know is that they’re getting plenty of healthy exercise into the bargain. But you do, so make life fun for them.

Provide plenty of hamster-safe toys to keep your pets busy into the night, while you’re asleep. Tubes are good, safe wooden objects to gnaw are ideal, a solid wheel is great. Be wary of toys which might trap their coat if your hamster is long-haired.

An exercise enclosure with lots of tubes and boxes is a great way to for your hamster to safely explore and exercise outside the cage. You don’t really want hamsters on the loose. They would be very hard to find and could get hurt.

Did you know?

Male hamsters are called boars.

Did you know?

Hamsters don't have a very good eyesight, they are short sighted so they rely on their senses to find their way around.

Quick Tip

A hamster's diet should consist of dried food, nuts and seeds but they are also omnivores which means they can't resist the occasional juicy mealworm.

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Burgess Hamster food

Have a question?

If you have a question, please email us or call us on 0800 413 969. Our dedicated consumer care team are available to answer any questions you may have. If you are concerned about the immediate health of your pet, please seek the advice of your vet as soon as possible.

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