Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Probiotics – are they any good?

21 March 2019

Probiotics are usually defined as live microorganisms that give a health benefit to the patient. Essentially, they are non-pathogenic bacteria that help the host. In veterinary medicine, we occasionally give them to our patients with the intention of improving overall wellbeing. They usually include exogenous and indigenous bacterial species that interact with and aid a variety of cellular processes within the host.

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Infectious bacterial diseases of rabbits

21 March 2019

If there was ever going to be a good time to be a rabbit, now is probably the best. More and more owners are keen to provide a high level of care for their pets, and as vets, we’re the most informed we’ve ever been about their health and needs.

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Leadership skills for vets and nurses

21 March 2019

The role of a team leader in the average busy veterinary practice are key the efficient and effective running of the clinic. Without their input, most practices would grind to a halt. So, if you’re an aspiring nurse/vet team leader, or are already in that role wanting to improve, we’ve put together a list of 13 attributes and skills you need.

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Congestive heart failure in rabbits

21 March 2019

How often do you consider heart disease in rabbits? We’re all familiar with making a diagnosis of heart disease or cardiomyopathy in cats and dogs, but rabbits are often overlooked. The reality though is that they are also affected, so be aware and look for the signs.

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Soft-tissue sarcomas

21 March 2019

What is a soft tissue sarcoma? These are common connective tissue tumours found in all animals. We see them frequently in our dog, cat and rabbit patients, affecting all sorts of tissues.

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The anorexic cat – appetite stimulants and practical tips

21 March 2019

We’ve all had the problem of an anorexic cat and the reality that, without food, the animal can’t heal and recover. The are many reasons why an animal might go off its food, so it’s important to get a diagnosis as early as possible, ensuring that we focus and deal with the primary problem. However, with this in mind, there are also some situations where it may be helpful to try to stimulate an animal to eat with the help of medication.

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