Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Blocked tear ducts and overflow – rabbits at risk

18 July 2018

Dacrocystitis resulting from inflammation of the nasolacrimal system is frequently encountered in rabbits and can be a frustrating condition to manage. Most rabbits present with a unilateral disease, but it can also occur in both eyes. The owner usually brings the rabbit to the vets because the eye looks red and there is a copious purulent ocular discharge. The hair next to the medial canthus is often wet and matted and sometimes the rabbit is unable to open the eye, as the discharge sticks the lids together.

Read more

Feline anorexia - 18 ways to help

18 July 2018

A cat that hasn’t eaten for more than 24 hours presents us with quite a challenge in vet practice. It’s important to recognise they need urgent attention, so in this short article we guide you through what to do. A cat with a sustained loss of appetite is referred to as being anorexic. Left untreated, they can rapidly develop severe liver disease from hepatic lipidosis, which can escalate into a devastating fatal condition.

Read more

Vitamin C deficiency in the guinea pig

18 July 2018

Guinea pigs, like humans and primates, lack the gene required to produce L-gulonolactone oxidase, the hepatic microsomal enzyme required to convert L-gulonolactone to L-ascorbic acid (Vitamin C). Since vitamin C is water-soluble and cannot be stored, guinea pigs therefore require a constant daily intake of vitamin C from their diet.

Read more

Feline vestibular disease

18 July 2018

Almost every vet and nurse in the country will have, at some time, been presented with a cat showing signs of vestibular disease. Knowing how to approach these cases and offer support and advice is both important and rewarding. In this article we take a look at the signs, causes and treatment options.

Read more

Time management skills – 20 ways to self-improve

18 July 2018

It’s so easy as a vet to let your work life balance get out of control. There are always too many things to do and never enough time. Consequently there have been many vets before us who have sadly suffered with burnout. The key to survival is to find a balance in your life, where your family, your career and your own self, live in harmony. In this article we offer suggestions to keep your life calm and balanced whilst working.

Read more

Canine aggression - 18 ways to avoid conflict in the consulting room

17 July 2018

All dogs can snap and bite, with some needing very little provocation. The main reasons they become aggressive in the veterinary environment is that they are anxious or afraid. They are protecting themselves. Vets and nurses come into contact with dogs of all sorts of shape, size and temperament every day. The ability to understand and respond correctly to aggression in the consulting room is essential for the health and wellbeing of everyone involved, including the patient.

Read more
Page 1 of 35 Next