Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Laryngeal Paralysis

12 August 2019

This is a condition where the larynx fails due to the inability to abduct the arytenoid cartilages during inspiration. The illness is more pronounced when a dog is exercising, hot and panting. You’ll notice a harsh noisy sound, particularly on inspiration. It can significantly reduce an animal’s exercise tolerance, and if not controlled, the airways can become so restrictive that the obstruction can be life threatening. We usually come across it in middle aged to older dogs of medium to large breeds such as Labradors, Retrievers and Weimaraners. It can be either congenital or acquired, with the most common form of the disease being geriatric onset laryngeal paralysis polyneuropathy.

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Sneezing rabbits – a difficult condition to cure

12 August 2019

Sneezing is a common complaint in rabbits, and is generally caused by a respiratory bacterial infection, Pasteurella multoci. Other organisms can be responsible, such as Bordatella spp. and Pseudomonas spp., so it’s ideal if you to take a swab for culture to check. For many rabbits, the infection is chronic, often lifelong, with signs regularly recurring whenever the animal is stressed.

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Bonding rabbits – our top tips on bringing rabbits together

12 August 2019

Did you see our Webinar on Rabbit bonding; making friends not foes” presented by Rae Todd and Anne McBride last year? If you follow the link to the Webinar Vet website, you’ll be able to get access to an hour of free rabbit CPD. Rabbits are social animals with complex needs. For far too long pet owners have not been aware of the stress and anxiety caused to rabbits when they are housed alone. In the wild they live in large complex social groups spending their time feeding, grooming and playing together, so we thought we would put together some ideas to help your clients introduce two rabbits together.

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Encephalitozoon cuniculi

12 August 2019

E.cuniculi is an obligate, intracellular, microsporidian parasite which infects many animals, including rabbits. It’s transmitted in utero and via the ingestion of infective spores shed in the urine, which enter the gut, then spread via the blood to the liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and brain. Disease is more likely in immunodeficient or young animals with immature immune systems, whilst animals with a healthy immune system may go on to develop a silent chronic infection. Rabbits with renal disease tend to have a worse prognosis than those with uveitis or neurological signs.

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Incontinence in dogs

12 August 2019

Many of our patients suffer from urinary incontinence, particularly as they get older. For some dogs the problem can start even earlier in life, but we’d generally expect to see this problem from middle age onwards. Urinary incontinence can result from congenital abnormalities, urine retention, urine overflow and sphincter incompetence. In this article we look at the most common cause of incontinence, urethral sphincter incompetence (USI).

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Degenerative joint disease – cats suffer as well

12 August 2019

Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a condition which results in progressive and long-term deterioration and damage of cartilage within joints. We’re all used to seeing it in dogs as they get old, but how often do we recognise it in cats? The reality is that they too suffer from this painful condition, so it’s important to look out for this with any ageing feline. Indeed, all mammals can develop this medical problem, including rabbits.

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