Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Hospitalising rabbits

26 June 2018

Caring for rabbits is a challenging task, particularly when a loving owner hands over the responsibility to you and your veterinary team. It’s essential we remember that rabbits are a prey species, and will always be acutely alert to potential danger. We must therefore ensure we make them feel safe, secure and comfortable during their stay at the surgery to try and reduce stress and pain related problems.

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Litter tray success – 11 suggestions to help your clients

26 June 2018

In the wild, rabbits will naturally choose to defecate and urinate in a few favourite locations, often in corners or boundaries. The fact that they choose where to go can help us as we can place litter trays in the areas where they prefer, and with a bit of luck, they’ll learn to use the tray quickly.

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House Rabbits – dealing with destruction

26 June 2018

House rabbits are extremely popular these days, with many families enjoying and appreciating the inquisitive and social characters of these wonderful pets. Bringing them into the home does come with some risks though, and one of the regular complaints we see is the damage to furniture, walls and carpets from chewing.

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Rodent anaesthetics – make the right choice

26 June 2018

Rodents are often anaesthetised for minor procedures, routine surgery (e.g. castration and ovariohysterectomy) and, from time to time, for more invasive surgery such as a tumour removal

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Flystrike – it’s that time of year again

26 June 2018

Whenever it gets warm during the UK summer, we all need to be on the look out for myiasis in rabbits. May to September are the times they are most at risk, though in recent years the trend has been to see the season start earlier and end later. Flies are attracted to damp fur, urine and faeces where they lay eggs. These eggs then develop into larvae and maggots, which are attracted to skin and underlying tissues.

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Sudden or unexpected death investigation – can you help?

26 June 2018

Unexpected death occurs more frequently in rabbits than in other pet animals. In order to find out more about the reasons for this, Frances and Nigel Harcourt-Brown are funding a “Sudden or unexpected death investigation”, offering histopathological investigations and arranging free ‘PCR testing for RHDV2’ on rabbits that die suddenly or unexpectedly.

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