Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Feline neutering – the pros and cons?

02 May 2019

The BVA has a strong position on neutering cats, being particularly keen to promote the prevention of unwanted kittens and stop the perpetuation of genetic defects. Together with the BSAVA, the BVA recommends that pet cats should be neutered from 16 weeks of age, whilst with feral and rescue kittens, it may be necessary to neuter them earlier (mainly due to the practicalities of catching the animals).

Read more

Prebiotics – what are they?

02 May 2019

Prebiotics are nutrients that can help support the essential beneficial or “good” gut bacteria and include carbohydrates and fibre. The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines them as "non-digestible food ingredients that selectively stimulate the growth and activities of specific bacteria in the gastro-intestinal tract and exert beneficial effects on the host."

Read more

Body condition scoring rabbits

02 May 2019

We’ve all seen them – far too many of our patients are becoming more and more overweight, and in rabbits it’s certainly a recurring clinical problem. They become overweight for a number of reasons...

Read more

Ulcerative pododermatitis in rabbits

02 May 2019

Rabbits are particularly prone to developing this chronic, painful and debilitating disease of the feet and hocks. It’s a condition which is often irreversible and has a significant impact on the welfare of the animal. You may find it also being referred to as sore hocks, avascular necrosis and pressure sores of the hocks and metatarsals.

Read more

Palliative care in veterinary practice

02 May 2019

“Quality of life and planned palliative care – 15 suggestions”. We have many opportunities to offer end of life care to our patients, whether they are a cat, dog, rabbit, hamster, horse or pet pig. There are no excuses these days to avoid discussing and offering this service. It should be part of our philosophy of care for all those patients that can’t be cured.

Read more

Feline Lymphoma

02 May 2019

Lymphoma is one of the most common forms of cancer in cats, accounting for around 1/3 of all tumours. Lymphoma is one of the most common forms of cancer in cats, accounting for around 1/3 of all tumours. The tumour cells originate and proliferate from both B and T lymphocytes in the bone marrow, lymph nodes and visceral organs. As a result, lymphoma can appear almost anywhere affecting vital organs such as the liver, kidneys and gastro-intestinal tract.

Read more
Page 2 of 45 Previous Next