Vet Blog

Tips, advice and talking points

Nutrition and cancer – what advice do you give?

17 February 2020

Many of our patients are living longer, healthier lives as a result of the improved lifestyles we can provide. With this increased life expectancy comes a higher chance of us seeing other problems such as renal, cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases. Fortunately, we have a much greater understanding of how they are affected and how we can help them. Cancer therapies are just one example of how we are winning, and one of the ways we can help is with nutrition to support them at these stressful times.

Read more

Lookout for cancer

17 February 2020

Many of our patients are living longer, healthier lives as a result of the improved lifestyles we give them. However, old age does increase the chances of an animal eventually developing cancer. Around 1 in 4 dogs and cats will face neoplastic conditions in their lifetime, so being able to recognise the early signs of disease can make all the difference. We should be encouraging our clients to look for any changes in their pets behaviour which could indicate something is wrong.

Read more

Stop medication errors

17 February 2020

Medication errors occur in all medical environments, irrespective of how clinically advanced they are. They arise from human error in a busy workplace with high demands. The good news is that there are many ways you can reduce these mistakes, and in this article, we give some practical solutions.

Read more

Medication errors

17 February 2020

Despite the intense training we get at college, we’re all human and at risk of making simple errors in our work. The consequences of any mistake we make can sometimes be very serious, so it goes without saying that we need to do all we can to avoid them.

Read more

Three feline toxins – paracetamol, ethylene glycol and lilies

17 February 2020

To supplement our article on emetics, gastric lavage and activated charcoal, we’re also including a short feature of three of the most common forms of toxicosis we see in cats, with particular reference to the clinical signs and treatment. The three poisons we look at are paracetamol, ethylene glycol and lilies.

Read more

Emetics, gastric lavage and activated charcoal

17 February 2020

Most examples of poisoning in small animals is as a result of them eating, licking and swallowing an external toxin. The key to successful poison management is to try to remove as much of the contaminant as soon as possible, either at source or by forcing its removal. We only have a small window of opportunity to achieve this before the toxin interferes with and damages vital tissues and organs. In many cases, the poison is best removed by inducing vomiting or performing a gastric lavage. You can also protect the animal further by feeding activated charcoal which helps by adsorption (the toxin adheres to the surface) and excretion.

Read more
Page 2 of 53 Previous Next